Simple Ways to Make Employees Feel Appreciated

by Robinson, Marcia Friday, October 28, 2011
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Every employee likes to feel appreciated. Some companies go to great extent to make employees feel appreciated with bonuses, trips or perks for reaching or surpassing goals. However, making employees feel appreciated and valued do not have to be as expensive or take much time.

If we were to ask most employees about what employers can do to make them feel more appreciated, the simple answers might surprise you. Some managers make it a habit to make employees feel appreciated and know their departments are better for it. Some managers believe a paycheck should be enough to show they appreciate the employee.

Making employees feel appreciated does not have to be part of an elaborate company- wide rewards program. Instead, these simple, everyday gestures from supervisors, managers or colleagues can go a long way to make employees feel appreciated and valued.

Make employees feel appreciated by greeting them

A colleague once told me that she left an organization because she felt ignored by a CEO who walked into an elevator with her. She said good-morning and although the CEO looked at her, he grunted a response and turned away. Two floors later when her colleague entered the elevator, the CEO acknowledged that person with a smile and handshake. They launched into a story about the son's golf game. A simple greeting from the CEO would have been enough to make my colleague feel appreciated.

Make employees feel appreciated through special assignments

Some supervisors don't realize they can make employees feel appreciated with special assignments. Although everyone has their assigned work, giving someone the opportunity to lead a project, represent the department in a program are two very simple ways to make employees feel appreciated.

Make employees feel appreciated with thank-you notes and letters

Which employee doesn't like to receive a thank-you note? The fact that a supervisor or colleague, took the time to write a thank-you note can make employees feel appreciated. Good work or going above and beyond shouldn't go unnoticed. I worked in a large university once where the Dean would sign letters of recognition to anyone in his department who received the university-wide performance bonus. He didn't have to do that. For some people the bonus award from the university was enough. For other's that letter from the Dean was also important.

Making employees feel appreciated does not have to be expensive. Making employees feel appreciated is only costly when an organization loses good people, simply because a manager didn't say. "Good Morning."